Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership https://globalleadershipsummit.ca Unpacking Canada’s role in the world at the nexus of trade, security, diplomacy and aid Tue, 19 Nov 2019 17:36:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/cropped-transparent-32x32.png Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership https://globalleadershipsummit.ca 32 32 The “F word”: Realizing Canada’s feminist foreign policy ambitions in a divided global and national context https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/the-f-word-realizing-canadas-feminist-foreign-policy-ambitions-in-a-divided-global-and-national-context/ Tue, 19 Nov 2019 17:20:15 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=4806 By Dr. Kate Grantham, International Development Consultant and Vice President of CASID   With the results of Canada’s recent federal election, Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government has been given another opportunity to advance its widely touted feminist foreign policy. However, this time around, the Liberals face the uphill battle of being a minority government, in a […]

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By Dr. Kate Grantham, International Development Consultant and Vice President of CASID

 

With the results of Canada’s recent federal election, Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government has been given another opportunity to advance its widely touted feminist foreign policy. However, this time around, the Liberals face the uphill battle of being a minority government, in a global context where right-wing nationalist and anti-feminist movements are on the rise.

 

Since taking office in 2015, Justin Trudeau’s federal government has made several major announcements demonstrating its commitment to a feminist foreign policy agenda. Most prominently, in June 2017, the government introduced its Feminist International Assistance Policy which “seeks to eradicate poverty and build a more peaceful, more inclusive and more prosperous world… [by] promoting gender equality and empowering women and girls.” Other examples include the government’s decision to make gender equality a centerpiece of its 2018 G7 presidency, its efforts to include gender protections in several recently negotiated free trade agreements, appointing Canada’s first-ever Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security, and committing to invest $1.4 billion over ten years for global initiatives promoting women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights.

 

The government’s ambitions are certainly admirable, and necessary to correct historical inattention to the diverse experiences of women and girls in Canadian foreign policy. Yet realizing a comprehensive feminist approach across all three pillars of Global Affairs Canada’s portfolio – diplomacy, trade and development – presents real challenges, particularly in the current global economic and political climate.

 

Countries in North America, Europe and around the world are witnessing the proliferation of right-wing nationalist and anti-feminist movements, which can be largely attributed as backlash against the perceived threat of a feminist agenda like the one Global Affairs Canada is pushing for.

 

In the United States, just two days after the historic Women’s March on Washington, Donald Trump reinstated the Obama-repealed global gag rule”, banning funding for organizations that perform abortion services, referrals or advocacy. Trump also expanded the policy to include, for the first-time, non-governmental organizations that support other groups that provide or merely discuss abortion. The current international climate makes Canada’s global leadership on gender equality – and on sexual and reproductive health and rights in particular – a critical and uphill battle.

 

Very real tensions also exist for realizing a comprehensive feminist foreign policy because the objectives of Canadian development, diplomacy and trade sectors are not always neatly aligned. Case in point, the Canadian government faced intense criticism earlier this year for proceeding with a $15 billion sale of light armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia, despite reports those vehicles may be used for military repression, in direct contradiction of feminist principles.

 

Similar tensions exist for Canada’s economic interests abroad, put into sharp focus when the government backtracked on a commitment to create an independent ombudsperson on corporate human rights. This was in spite of evidence of widespread and egregious human rights abuses by Canadian companies and supply chains abroad, including in the mining, oil and gas, and garment sectors.

 

Back at home, Canadian public support for international development assistance is seen to be waning in some circles. The promise made by Conservative leader Andrew Scheer to cut Canadian foreign aid spending by 25 per cent if elected signals the deeply politicized and insecure position of Canadian foreign aid spending. Scheer’s announcement was met with alarm bells by those working in the aid sector, who were particularly critical of the misinformation being spread during the campaign. The broader Canadian public, however, remained relatively disengaged from the issue. While most Canadians agree that we have a duty to support the health, education and economic opportunity for the world’s poorest and most marginalized, public opinion research from the Canadian Partnership for Women and Children’s Health (CanWaCH) finds that nearly one-quarter of Canadians disagree with this idea.

 

If the federal government has any serious ambition of moving the needle on Canadian foreign aid spending from the current 0.28 percent of GNI to meet Canada’s decades-old commitment of 0.7 percent, then it must work to generate broader public education and support for the goals of a feminist international assistance policy.

 

These are real challenges and tensions that need to be tackled head-on in order for Canada to realize the critical ambitions of its feminist foreign policy agenda.

 

The Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership, taking place in Ottawa on November 27 and 28, is a unique opportunity to discuss Canada’s foreign policy with individuals working across the development, diplomacy and trade nexus. Several different plenaries and breakout sessions will address this issue, with diverse speakers from Canada and internationally scheduled to take part in the program.

 

The opening plenary on November 27, “Setting the tone: What should Canada’s foreign policy agenda be?” will feature Shirley Kimmayong (Founder of Hagiyo Organization Inc.), Shirley Pryce (Founder of the Jamaican Household Workers Union) and Hugh Segal (Former Conservative Senator) discussing a shared vision for an ambitious and impactful Canadian foreign policy agenda.

 

On November 28, Canada’s Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security, Jacqueline O’Neill, and General Jonathan Vance, Canadian Armed Forces Chief of the Defence Staff, will headline a post-lunch plenary on “Strengthening Women’s Participation on Peace Processes and Conflict Resolution” moderated by Ketty Nivyabandi of the Nobel Women’s Initiative. This session will address the intersections of gender and women’s leadership in global challenges to peace and security, and how these intersections can inform Canadian foreign policy.

 

Multiple breakout sessions will also touch on the issue of feminist foreign policy, including Beijing+25: Influencing priorities and opportunities for engagement” on November 27, and on November 28, “Feminism(s) in gender equality and women’s empowerment programming” and “Justice climatique féministe”.

 

 

Dr. Kate Grantham is an international development consultant specializing in feminist research and approaches. She is also Vice President of the Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID). Follow @KateGrantham on Twitter.

 

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Writing Competition Winner – Guillaume Baggio Ferla https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/writing-competition-winner-guillaume-baggio-ferla/ Mon, 18 Nov 2019 17:50:30 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=4661 The Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to announce the winners of the CCIC and CASID writing competition for emerging academics/researchers and practitioners across Canada, Emily Kocsis and Guillaume Baggio.  Emily Kocsis’ piece entitled “Mainstreaming agroecology: A Canadian leadership imperative” was selected for the practitioner stream and Guillaume Baggio’s piece entitled “Moving beyond calories: a quest for better […]

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The Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to announce the winners of the CCIC and CASID writing competition for emerging academics/researchers and practitioners across Canada, Emily Kocsis and Guillaume Baggio.  Emily Kocsis’ piece entitled “Mainstreaming agroecology: A Canadian leadership imperative” was selected for the practitioner stream and Guillaume Baggio’s piece entitled “Moving beyond calories: a quest for better evidence on culture, food insecurity and peace” was selected for the Academic/Researcher stream. You can find their submitted written pieces below as well as their bios.   

Please note that the written submissions were assessed based on the criteria outlined here.  The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

 

Guillaume Baggio Ferla 

Academic/Researcher Stream  

United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health, Research Assistant  

Guillaume Baggio is a young professional on water and sustainability and received a B.Eng. Degree from Polytechnique de Montréal, Canada in 2017. Before joining the UNU-INWEH, he worked on several projects on the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events on the electricity grid in Canada and headed a group of young professionals in a project about smart cities in Canada, Finland, and Baltic Nations. His areas of interest include developing a policy support system to promote evidence-based policymaking for achieving SDGs by 2030 and investigating better ways to design workable policies in data-poor contexts. Overall, he is also excited in analysing how to assure sustainability and well-being under different socioeconomic pathways. 

 

 

Moving beyond calories: a quest for better evidence on culture, food insecurity and peace

 

Food insecurity and hunger are yet to become problems of distant times. According to the latest assessment, an estimated of 821 million1 people were undernourished in 2017, a number higher than in previous years, and about 2 billion2 people have faced moderate and severe levels of food insecurity. To address such challenges, the 2030 Agenda adopted by UN Member States in 2015 directs global efforts to “end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture” under the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 and its many targets and indicators to track progress at the national level. For instance, Target 2.1 aims to “end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular, the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round”. However, achieving this target by 2030 will require uncountable efforts as several factors have contributed to the persistence and rise of food insecurity and hunger globally, such as economic shocks, climate change and conflicts. Indeed, in conflict-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the number of undernourished people increased by 23.4 million3 between 2015 and 2018, a higher increase compared to countries not affected by conflicts. 

 

While the links between access to food and conflicts have been widely discussed among policymakers and experts over the last decades4,5, data and evidence for policymaking to address these issues are still missing to this day. Several metrics6 and indicators7 have been developed over time to track the status of food insecurity and hunger worldwide. However, even though the prevalence of undernourishment measured by the average amount of calories per capita8 and the extension of food insecurity in the population given by people’s lack of access to food9 are key indicators to monitor the progress against food insecurity and hunger, these indicators do little to understand how access to food links to culture and traditional knowledge, especially among those affected by conflicts. Culture and peace-building are also not highlighted among the main links between SDG 2 and other development goals10. Nevertheless, culture is perhaps one of the most critical factors determining society’s relation to food and wellbeing, and the lack of understanding of how culture crosscuts food insecurity and peace-building might prevent more effective policies to achieve SDG 2 in the next couple of years. Therefore, in a world where food abundance coexists with a prevalent lack of access to safe, nutritious and sustainable food, determining how culture shapes what and how people eat is critical. Indeed, food and ways of eating are all part of the culture of a society, as “they shape the senses of personal identity, of self-determination, of belonging within a family and society”11. 

 

For this, gaps in data and evidence must be promptly addressed by national and international organizations to build a better understating of how culture-oriented policymaking can fight food insecurity and support peace. This is not to say that policymaking to achieve SDG 2 and build a more peaceful society is easy. Making the right policy decisions in the SDG era can be quite complex, requiring policymakers and development actors to assess and combine many pieces of evidence. And while humanitarian responses to food insecurity and conflict might focus of assuring immediate access to safe and sufficient food and conflict resolution, building long-term sustainable policies to address food insecurity and peace need to cast some light on how those affected by conflicts, often displaced from their places of origin, build identity, tradition and sense of belongingness around access to food. Ending food insecurity and hunger as a mean of fostering and strengthening a more peaceful and conflict-free society might be only effective if long-term sustainable policies cease to use the measure of calorie intake as the main or sole indicator for food insecurity. 

 

For this, Canada must lead international efforts by promoting a framework for achieving long-term sustainable food security and strengthening peace-building efforts through the lens of people’s culture and identity. Indeed, the 2030 Agenda National Strategy12 already points out the role of indigenous knowledge to achieve SDGs, but more remains to be made at the national and international level to assure a better understanding of the role of culture in the untangled knots of food insecurity and conflicts. At this stage, producing evidence and measurement tools must rapidly evolve to meet the monitoring challenges for sustainable development, and new indicators for food insecurity must be proposed to collect data and produce evidence that fits for policymaking in times where peace can only be achieved and food insecurity can only be eliminated when people’s culture and tradition are taken into account. 

 

References 

 

  1. UN. 2019. Special edition: progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Report of the Secretary-General. New York, United Nations. 

 

  1. FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WFP and WHO. 2019. The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2019. Safeguarding against economic slowdowns and downturns. Rome, FAO. 

 

  1. FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WFP and WHO. 2017. The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2017. Building resilience for peace and food security. Rome, FAO 

 

  1. Martin-Shields, C., Stojetz, W. 2018. Food security and conflict. Empirical challenges and future opportunities for research and policy making on food security and conflict. FAO Agricultural Development Economics Working Paper 18-04. Rome, FAO. 

 

  1. Holleman, C., Jackson, J., Sánchez, M.V., Vos, R. 2017. Sowing the seeds of peace for food security – Disentangling the nexus between conflict, food security and peace, FAO Agricultural Development Economics Technical Study 2. Rome, FAO 

 

  1. The Economist Intelligence United. 2018. Global Food Security Index 2018. Building Resilience in the face of rising food-security risks. London, The Economist. 

 

  1. UN. 2017. 2017 HLPF Thematic review of SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved 

 

nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Available at: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/14371SDG2_format.revised_FINAL_28_04.pd f 

 

  1. UNSTATS. 2016. Metadata: Goal 2 End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and 

 

promote sustainable agriculture. Available at: https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/files/metadata-compilation/Metadata-Goal-2.pdf 

 

  1. FAO. 2016. Methods for estimating comparable rates of food insecurity experienced by adults throughout the world. Rome, FAO. 

 

  1. Nilsson, M. 2017. Important interactions among the Sustainable Development Goals under review at the High-Level Political Forum 2017. Stockholm, SEI. 

 

  1. Ministry of Health of Brazil. 2015.. Dietary Guidelines for the Brazilian population. Brasília: Ministry of Health of Brazil. 

 

  1. Government of Canada. 2019. Towards Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy. Available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/agenda-2030/national-strategy.html 

 

 

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Writing Competition Winner – Emily Kocsis https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/writing-competition-winner-emily-kocsis/ Mon, 18 Nov 2019 17:23:34 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=4637 The Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to announce the winners of the CCIC and CASID writing competition for emerging academics/researchers and practitioners across Canada, Emily Kocsis and Guillaume Baggio.  Emily Kocsis’ piece entitled “Mainstreaming agroecology: A Canadian leadership imperative” was selected for the practitioner stream and Guillaume Baggio’s piece entitled “Moving beyond calories: a quest for better […]

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The Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to announce the winners of the CCIC and CASID writing competition for emerging academics/researchers and practitioners across Canada, Emily Kocsis and Guillaume Baggio.  Emily Kocsis’ piece entitled “Mainstreaming agroecology: A Canadian leadership imperative” was selected for the practitioner stream and Guillaume Baggio’s piece entitled “Moving beyond calories: a quest for better evidence on culture, food insecurity and peace” was selected for the Academic/Researcher stream. You can find their submitted written pieces below as well as their bios.   

Please note that the written submissions were assessed based on the criteria outlined here.  The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

 

Emily Kocsis 

Practitioner Stream  

Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research, Student and Young Professionals Network Coordinator

Emily is an inter-disciplinary global health practitioner with a passion for systems thinking and ecosystem approaches to health. Currently, Emily works as a Research Assistant for an Indigenous Health consulting group, and as the Coordinator for the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research’s Students and Young Professionals Network. Emily earned her MSc in Global Health from McMaster University in 2014, focusing her research on traditional food systems in East Africa. Over the past five years, Emily has worked on a number of research and capacity building projects related to agriculture and food security in Peru, Canada, Kenya and Vietnam. Hailing from the fruit belt of Niagara, Emily has spent much of her life surrounded by agriculture. With plans to investigate the interplay between agriculture, migration and food sovereignty in Latin America through a PhD next year, Emily hopes to continue to explore and contribute to the global effort to build more sustainable food systems. 

 

 

Mainstreaming agroecology: A Canadian leadership imperative

 

The future of industrial agriculture has become increasingly uncertain.1 Decades after the industrial farming practices of the “Green Revolution” were introduced, global food systems continue to be plagued by issues that have consequences for individuals and ecosystems alike.2 Modern industrial agriculture is depleting the world’s natural resources and generating record-breaking amounts of pollution and waste.3 We are producing enormous amounts of food per capita, and yet inequalities in food production and consumption have created a landscape where millions are malnourished, anemic or obese.4 As the socio-ecological costs of a system that privileges productivity over sustainability are revealed, an alternative model has emerged: agroecology.   

 

Agroecology is an integrated approach to sustainable agriculture that applies ecological and social concepts and principles to re-design food systems from “farm to fork”.5 In agroecological practice, interactions between plants, animals, and humans are holistically integrated, with the ultimate goal of balancing community and ecosystem needs.6 Agroecology is the antithesis to the “one-size-fits-all” model; instead, it blends ecological science with traditional knowledge to co-create solutions to local problems.7 Although it is not a new invention– first described in the scientific literature in the 1920’s–support for agroecological farming has grown exponentially in recent years.8,9 This is due in part to landmark studies and data that illustrate agroecology’s capacity to: contribute to the production of nutritious food, safeguard biodiversity, promote adaptation to climate change, preserve food cultures, and boost local economies.10 UN institutions, international agencies, and governments have galvanized support for agroecology, with the FAO asserting that agroecology must be urgently “scaled up” to achieve sustainable food systems.11  

 

The paradigmatic shift that has repositioned agroecology from fringe to centre stage presents a significant window of opportunity for Canada. As governments around the world begin to introduce programs and policies that explicitly support agroecology, Canada ought to reflect on its own approach to sustainable development and begin to take steps towards defining itself as a champion for agroecology. There are a number of different entry points for Canadian leadership, however, three areas in particular warrant consideration: 1) mainstreaming agroecology in development policy; 2) supporting the multilateral policy environment; and, 3) bolstering knowledge exchange and research.  

 

To lay the groundwork for a leadership role, Canada must review its own international assistance policies, and prioritize agroecology. When the Government of Canada released it’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP), markedly absent were long-standing priority areas for Canadian development assistance: agriculture and food security.12 Given that agriculture is central to the economy of most developing countries, with nearly 66% of rural people making their living through farming, Canadian development support is unlikely to be successful unless agriculture is made a priority.13,14 But, it is important to recognize that not all agricultural strategies are equally effective, and championing the right approach is critical. Canada should respond to evidence that smallholder agriculture has the highest potential to alleviate poverty—especially among women and girls—by supporting an approach that aligns with the needs and interests of peasant farmers: agroecology.15 Given that the FIAP is still in its infancy, there remains ample opportunity to remedy the exclusion of agriculture and food security by mainstreaming agroecology in the FIAP’s six key action areas. The FIAP provides a strong foundation to stand on, but with SDG targets fast-approaching, it is imperative to make agroecology a key component of Canada’s feminist international assistance goals. 

 

Supporting a constructive public policy environment at the international level is another entry point for Canada to exercise leadership. Despite withdrawing slightly in recent years, Canada continues to be recognized as a major player in multilateral development cooperation.16 Given our reputation and credibility, Canada ought to use its voice at international tables to encourage financial and regulatory policies that support the scaling up of agroecology. The policies that multilateral bodies like the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development create deeply impact rural livelihoods.17 For example, at the Doha Round of WTO trade negotiations, a group of 33 countries successfully blocked a suite of measures that would have eroded local food sovereignty by allowing floods of cheap imports to be “dumped” into developing countries. Canada must support economic and trade policies that give low and middle-income countries the tools to protect their right to food.18 By advocating for agroecology-friendly policies, Canada has the opportunity to both re-assert itself on the world stage and improve the health and wellbeing of millions.  

 

Lastly, Canada can advance the transition to agroecology by bolstering research and knowledge-exchange. The foundation of agroecological practice is farmers’ knowledge of local ecosystems and crops. This approach is fundamentally different to industrial agriculture, where information typically flows “top-down”, from research institution to farmer.19 Because agroecology is far more knowledge-intensive, existing processes for knowledge creation and dissemination must be strengthened, and new practices developed.20 Canada can make a profound contribution in this space. At the local level, organizations working at the intersection of agriculture and development can champion initiatives that institutionalize knowledge-sharing, such as farmer-to-farmer networks and community seed banks. Nationally, research institutions, like the International Development Research Centre can advance the knowledge-base of agroecology by funding research that works directly with farmers to characterize agroecological practices in different cultural and environmental contexts.21 Finally, at the international level, Canada should continue to be an ally to movements like La Via Campesina, that use the grassroots knowledge, ideas and experiences of farmers to achieve food sovereignty. 

 

The environmental, economic and social implications of decades of industrialized agriculture are becoming increasingly apparent, precipitating momentous activity in the agri-food space. As agroecology gains traction globally, new spaces for actors to actualize policy, advocacy and action are emerging.22 Canada must seize this opportunity, and lead the way in advancing an agroecological agenda. Despite the discourse that pushes “magic bullet” solutions to the world’s food insecurity ills, what is likely needed are systemic changes to the way we grow and consume food.23 As an approach that focuses on pluralistic, interdisciplinary action, agroecology is an encouraging way forward, and Canada would do well to demonstrate its leadership.  

 

 

References 

  1.  IAASTD, Agriculture at a Crossroads. International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development Global Report, 2009, Washington, DC: Island Press. 
  1.  FAO. Symposium on Agroecology and Food Security, 2014. 
  1. World Bank, Agriculture and Food Overview, 2019 
  1. FAO, The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World. 2019.  
  1. Stephen Gliessman, “Transforming Food Systems with Agroecology,” Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems 40, no. 3 (2016). 
  1. Tommy Dalgaard, Nicholas Hutchings, John Porter, “Agroecology, scaling and interdisciplinarity,” Agriculture Ecosystems and Environment 100, no.1 (2003). 
  1.  FAO. The 10 Elements of Agroecology: Guiding the Transition to Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems, 2018. 
  1. Stephen GliessmanAgroecology: Ecological Processes in Sustainable Agriculture (Boca Raton: Lewis Publishers, 1998). 
  1. FAO. Symposium on Agroecology and Food Security.  
  1.  IAASTD. Agriculture at a Crossroads. 
  1.  FAO. Symposium on Agroecology and Food Security.  
  1. Matias Margulis, Why global feminism and food security go hand in hand, 2017 <https://www.opencanada.org/features/why-global-feminism-and-food-security-go-hand-hand/> [accessed October 22 2019] 
  1.  Ibid. 
  1.  FAO, The economic lives of smallholder farmers: An analysis based on household data from 9 countries, 2015. 
  1. FAO. Symposium on Agroecology and Food Security. 
  1. Stephen Brown and Michael Olender, “Canada’s Fraying Commitment to Multilateral Development Cooperation” in Multilateral Development Cooperation in a Changing Global Order, eds. Hany Besada and Shannon Kindornay (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013),158-88. 
  1.  M Wibbelmann, “Mainstreaming Agroecology: Implications for Global Food and Farming Systems Centre for Agroecology and Food Security Discussion Paper. Coventry: Centre for Agroecology and Food Security. (2013) 
  1. Ibid.  
  1. United Nations General Assembly, Human Rights Council. Report submitted by the Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter2010. 
  1.  Ibid. 
  1.  IPES-Food, Breaking away from industrial food and farming systems: Seven case studies of agroecological transition, 2018. 
  1. Raquel Gonzalez, Jessica Thomas, Marina Chang, Translating Agroecology into Policy: The Case of France and the United Kingdom,” Sustainability 10, no. 2390 (2018). 
  1. IPES-Food, Breaking away from industrial food and farming systems: Seven case studies of agroecological transition 

 

 

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Is it Time to Reshape Canada’s Foreign Policy? https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/is-it-time-to-reshape-canadas-foreign-policy/ Mon, 18 Nov 2019 15:09:40 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=4568 PRESS RELEASE Is it Time to Reshape Canada’s Foreign Policy?   Ottawa, ON. November 18, 2019 — In a world that seems at once increasingly divided and evermore interconnected, what is Canada’s role as a global leader? As interests and institutions that became increasingly universal over the last 75 years – economic liberalism, state sovereignty, […]

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PRESS RELEASE

Is it Time to Reshape Canada’s Foreign Policy?

 

Ottawa, ON. November 18, 2019 — In a world that seems at once increasingly divided and evermore interconnected, what is Canada’s role as a global leader?

As interests and institutions that became increasingly universal over the last 75 years – economic liberalism, state sovereignty, human rights, collective security and multilateral organizations – no longer unify global actors, how should Canada engage with the international system?

Those are some of the questions the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) and partners will address during a two-day Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership, featuring leaders from all sectors of Canada’s foreign policy, including defence, diplomacy, security, climate change and international aid sectors. The Summit will take place on November 27 and 28, in Ottawa.

To engage with Canadian foreign policy thought leaders in advance of the Summit, organizers are releasing a vision statement titled: Canada Engaged: An Initial Vision Statement for Canada’s International Policy. This document will serve as a starting position and reflection piece to stimulate policy discussion and development. This initial vision statement has been developed and endorsed by an advisory committee composed of 11 leaders representing perspectives and experiences across the range of foreign policy and international affairs.

 

Read the Vision Statement 

 

“We want to create a cross-cutting dialogue that will support an ambitious strategic commitment to Canada’s global cooperation and leadership based on comparative advantages,” says Nicolas Moyer, President and CEO of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation. “In order to achieve the most effective and impactful outcomes in Canada’s foreign policy, all parts of Canadian society need to be engaged – and that’s what this Summit seeks to do.”

On November 27 and 28, leaders and thinkers from across Canada and internationally will discuss how Canada can use its foreign policy to achieve high impact in support of an inclusive and equitable world order – by addressing climate change and other global challenges through a whole-of-society approach, promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment, and setting an example at home.

Media are invited to attend portions of the Summit. A schedule of opportunities to interview many of the presenters and speakers throughout the event will be available shortly.

 

Keynote speakers include:

  • General Jonathan Vance, Chief of Defence Staff
  • Jacqueline O’Neill, Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security
  • Bob Rae, former minister and Ontario Premier
  • Richard Fadden, former National Security advisor
  • Stephen Cornish, CEO David Suzuki Foundation
  • Peggy Mason, President of the Rideau Institute and former Ambassador to the UN

 

The Summit is presented by the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC), the Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID), the Canadian Partnership for Women and Health (CanWaCH), and the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (CGAI).

For a complete list of speakers and agenda, visit globalleadershipsummit.ca. Included in this package is the vision statement developed to help guide participants at the Summit.

– 30-

 

For more information about the Summit or to arrange interviews with speakers, contact:

Thida Ith
Media and Communications Officer/ Agente des médias et des communications
Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC)
39 rue McArthur Ave., Ottawa, ON, K1L 8L7
tith@ccic.ca
(613) 241-7007 ext. 343
cell : (437) 779-0883

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Meet Stephen Cornish – CEO of David Suzuki Foundation https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/meet-stephen-cornish-ceo-of-david-suzuki-foundation/ Fri, 25 Oct 2019 13:50:41 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=3430 Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership is thrilled to introduce Stephen Cornish as a keynote speaker. Mr. Cornish is CEO of the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF), a leading Canadian environmental non-profit organization.     Before joining DSF, he spent five years as executive director of Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) Canada, where he led a […]

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Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership is thrilled to introduce Stephen Cornish as a keynote speaker. Mr. Cornish is CEO of the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF), a leading Canadian environmental non-profit organization.

 

 

Before joining DSF, he spent five years as executive director of Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) Canada, where he led a team that ushered in tremendous change and growth. He has also served with the Canadian Red Cross and CARE Canada and sits on the boards of directors for several charitable organizations, including as honorary member with the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment.

 

From his first overseas mission in Nepal dealing with renewable energy and waste management issues, to sustainable community forestry activities in Central America, to more recent work on environmental health impacts of extractives, Stephen has long been convinced of our collective duty to protect the natural world and ultimately guarantee our own place within it.

 

He holds a master’s degree in global risk and crisis management from the Sorbonne in Paris and a post-graduate diploma in conflict resolution from the University of Bradford.

 

Stephen has helped spur public debate in Canada on pressing social and humanitarian issues, both as an analyst and contributor to news outlets such as the Globe and Mail, National Post and Policy Options.

 

In 2016, he was named one of the top 30 charity CEOs on social media. Make sure to connect with Stephen on Twitter

 

Join us for Stephen Cornish’s amazing talk on climate change! Register here!

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Top 10 Reasons Why You Need to Attend the Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/top-10-reasons-why-you-need-to-attend-the-summit-on-canadas-global-leadership/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 14:18:57 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=3128   1. Be a part of shaping Canada’s future foreign policy agenda Following the 2019 federal election, the Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership will bring together leaders and key decision-makers from the public, private and non-profit sectors to examine the potential for a more ambitious and comprehensive foreign policy agenda. Register today and be a […]

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1. Be a part of shaping Canada’s future foreign policy agenda

Following the 2019 federal election, the Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership will bring together leaders and key decision-makers from the public, private and non-profit sectors to examine the potential for a more ambitious and comprehensive foreign policy agenda. Register today and be a part of the conversation!

 

 

 

2. Unparalleled networking opportunities

 

Network and engage with government representatives, civil society organizations, academics and activists working in all of Canada’s global affairs sectors – trade, development, global health, diplomacy, humanitarian assistance, human rights and more!

 

 

 

 

3. Work towards the realization of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy

 

Hear directly from organizations working on the frontlines of implementing Canada’s Feminist International Assistance policy, including women, gender diverse people and youth directly affected by Canada’s international humanitarian and development policies and programs.

 

 

 

 

4. Help Canada meet its objectives for the Sustainable Development Goals

 

As the world approaches the 10-year mark to reaching the SDGs, the Summit presents a key opportunity to strategize on what still needs to be done to reach the objectives of Agenda 2030.

 

 

 

5. Listen to and engage with high-profile key-note speakers and panelists

 

Get your ticket to listen to high-profile keynote speakers and panelists from Canada and around the world. Hear more about their experience, expertise and insights on topics such as climate change, comprehensive foreign policy, global governance and refugee and migration.

 

 

 

 

6. Attend exciting side events and public event programming

 

Alongside the Summit will be many exciting side events and several key public events and receptions in the evening, allowing for even more learning and networking opportunities.

 

 

 

7. Face time with high-level officials

 

Get face time with government officials and representatives from some of the biggest think tanks, NGOs and research institutes in Canada and internationally!

 

 

 

8. Meet and interact with the amazing sponsoring organizations and exhibitors at the forefront of global development

 

Learn more about their role in advancing Canada’s global leadership and how they help shape the conversation on Canada’s progressive role in the world.

 

 

 

9. Expand your global affairs knowledge

 

The Summit is the first of its kind, bringing together ALL the global affairs sectors in Canada. It will be an unparalleled opportunity to examine and advance global issues with a multi-disciplinary approach.

 

 

 

10. Enjoy a visit to beautiful Ottawa!

 

Visit Canada’s capital city and in your free time tour the Parliament buildings, check out any of the seven national museums and explore the historic Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site!

 

 

 

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Youth Bursary https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/youth-bursary/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:10:08 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=2962     The Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership is focused on providing an opportunity to understand where Canadian state and non-state actors stand at the nexus of international trade, security, diplomacy, development and humanitarian assistance, and doing so at a moment immediately following the federal election and at the 10-year-out mark of the SDGs/2030. The […]

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The Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership is focused on providing an opportunity to understand where Canadian state and non-state actors stand at the nexus of international trade, security, diplomacy, development and humanitarian assistance, and doing so at a moment immediately following the federal election and at the 10-year-out mark of the SDGs/2030. The Summit is also a platform to challenge one another to engage in reflexive cross-related analysis of Canada’s foreign policy goals, strategies and actions.

Youth are key constituents in Canada’s global activities and in achieving the SDGs, now and particularly looking to the future. In order to support meaningful youth engagement in the conference, the Summit Partners, along with our Youth Sponsors Engineers Without Borders and World University Service of Canada, are excited to present the following youth bursary opportunity.

The Bursaries

The Summit is committed to ensuring that young Canadians across all geographies and backgrounds can attend the Summit on Global Leadership in Ottawa November 27 – 28 and participate and add their voice into the discussions.

The bursaries provide financial assistance to people who would otherwise be unable to attend. Bursary recipients will receive full-funding to attend the Summit, including Summit registration, domestic travel to and from Ottawa, accommodation while in Ottawa, and a $100 stipend, subject to the specific details and limitations outlined below.

The bursaries are open to individuals 35 and under (as of December 31, 2019), but preference will be given to applicants working/volunteering/interning in global governance and health, feminist foreign policy, climate change and/or refugees and migration with grassroots/community organizations and entities with small operating budgets. Additional consideration will focus on providing access for and ensuring representation from marginalized and diverse groups.

The number of bursaries provided will depend on the final amount of Youth Sponsors and on the locations of recipients. We anticipate funding 8 – 12 individuals.

 

 

DEADLINE to apply: October 13th, 5pm, EDT.

Please note that only selected applicants will be contacted. ​

If you have any questions please email info@canwach.ca

 

APPLY HERE

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Canadian Foodgrains Bank Writing Competition https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/canadian-foodgrains-bank-writing-competition/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 12:37:37 +0000 https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/?p=2676   Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to be sponsoring a CCIC and CASID (as part of the NextGen program) writing competition for emerging academics and practitioners across Canada.  The competition will be an opportunity for individuals under the age of 35 that are working in international cooperation to share their writing and research on global poverty […]

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Canadian Foodgrains Bank is pleased to be sponsoring a CCIC and CASID (as part of the NextGen program) writing competition for emerging academics and practitioners across Canada.  The competition will be an opportunity for individuals under the age of 35 that are working in international cooperation to share their writing and research on global poverty and food insecurity, as it relates to the fields of trade, peace, security or diplomacy.

 

Awards: There will be a $200.00 prize awarded to a winner in each stream (academic and practitioner) as well as free participation in the Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership. The winners will also be invited to pitch their writing submission during the Summit. 

 

Guidelines:   Writing submissions must be written in an editorial format with a word limit of 1000 words.  Submissions will be accepted in both English and French. We will offer two streams, an academic stream and a practitioner stream. The deadline for submissions is Friday November 1, 2019 at midnight (ET). 

 

Criteria for Selection:  

  • The piece must be written by an individual or two individuals (in which case only one admission fee to the Summit and prize will be presented to both). 
  • The piece can be no longer than 1000 words and must be clearly and concisely written in an accessible editorial format (no academic language or jargon) in either English or French. 
  • The written piece must not have been previously published. 
  • The author(s) must be under 35. 
  • The piece must touch on the intersection of global poverty and food insecurity with either trade, peace, security or diplomacy.  

 

The piece must be evidence-based, focussed, include background information on the issue, provide a clear analysis of the problem and consider why it matters for Canadian foreign policy.  The pieces will be judged based on the criteria mentioned above and will consider how well the submission uses evidence to analyze the intersection of global poverty and food insecurity with either trade, peace, security or diplomacy.  The evaluation will also consider how clearly the submission is written and whether the argument and analysis are presented in a compelling manner.  

 

Submission Format: Please submit your writing piece in a PDF document.   

How to submit: Please submit your writing piece using this form

DeadlineFriday November 1, 2019 at midnight (ET) 

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Plan Your Stay! https://globalleadershipsummit.ca/how-to-find-our-venue/ Fri, 30 Aug 2019 17:17:50 +0000 http://showthemes.com/mondree-demo/take-a-look-at-this-is-a-really-long-news-headline-2/   The Ottawa Conference and Event Centre isn’t just one of the national capital region’s largest event facilities; it’s also one of the most accommodating. Centrally located off the 417 at the Vanier Parkway, perfectly positioned between 2 major brand hotels; The Hampton Inn Ottawa by Hilton and the Courtyard by Marriott Ottawa East. Featuring 43, […]

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The Ottawa Conference and Event Centre isn’t just one of the national capital region’s largest event facilities; it’s also one of the most accommodating.

Centrally located off the 417 at the Vanier Parkway, perfectly positioned between 2 major brand hotels; The Hampton Inn Ottawa by Hilton and the Courtyard by Marriott Ottawa East. Featuring 43, 000 square feet of modern meeting space with a captivating 90-foot windowed atrium, full-service catering, complimentary parking, and flexible accommodations with just under 600 guest rooms.

 

PLAN YOUR STAY

 

 

Courtyard by Marriott Ottawa East – $149/night

Booking available until October 25, 2019 

To book by phone can call our in-house reservations at (613) 741-9862 and ask to book under group code: (CCO)

There is also the option for the guest that would like to book online via the link below:

CANADIAN COUNCIL FOR INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATION

 

 

Hampton by Hilton Ottawa – $136/night

Booking available until October 26, 2019

(613) 741-2300

Group name: Summit on Canada’s Global Leadership

• Free hot breakfast offered daily, allowing your guests to start their day off right

• Free underground and outdoor parking.

• Free Wi-Fi Internet access in all guestrooms and lobby, allowing your guests to easily stay connected to their customers and family while at the hotel.

 

 

Air Canada is the official airline for the Summit. Please use the following promo code via aircanada.com to receive a discount on your flight to Ottawa.

Your promotion code: FE93ZBP1

 The travel period begins Wednesday, November 20, 2019 and ends Thursday, December 05, 2019

 

 

 

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